eFax Corporate Pricing Plan & Cost Guide

eFax Corporate

Online faxing service

3.42/5 (12 reviews)

eFax Corporate Pricing

Starting from: £11.00/month

Pricing model: Subscription

Free Trial: Available (No Credit Card required)

Plus: £11/month or £110/year
Pro: £16/month or £160/year
Super Pro: £25/month or £250/year

Competitors Pricing

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Pricing Comparison

How does eFax Corporate compare with other Communications apps?

Subscription plan?

eFax Corporate



95% of apps offer a
subscription plan

Free trial?

eFax Corporate



78% of apps have a
free trial

Freemium plan?

eFax Corporate



29% of apps have a
freemium plan

Pricing Comparison

Communications app prices shown are $/month




eFax Corporate Pricing Reviews

Pros
  • Reasonably priced way to adopt a secure, cloud based fax solution. Access inbound and outbound faxes from any device with a browser, securely. Automatic e-archive of fax communications.
  • eFax allows end-users to send documents online. eFax offers a free trial to send 150 pages per transfer. eFax allows end-users to send 150 incoming as well as outgoing faxes per the free trial. eFax does not require an initial activation fee. eFax allows end-users to select personal faxing number. eFax offers two types of subscriptions such as Plus and Pro with two different types of feature prices.
  • I love how easy this is to use and the level of integration it has with our software. We send and receive faxes for it with very few problems. Their customer support team is out of this world. The longest I've waited for a reply was under an hour and that was because our direct rep was on a plane. We commonly have less than 5 minute response times. They give good price breaks on quantity.. we send and receive about 70,000 pages per month and get a great rate. Much more economical than maintaining standard machines.
  • I suppose for big corporations (or law firms, where I once worked and eFax supplied everyone with their own fax line), this is a good product. However, even when I used it at the law firm, I did not always get notification as I should have, or as fast as I should have, of the receipt of a fax. Or confirmation of a fax. It's nice to have the history of the faxes you've received, so you can go back and get something if you need to. Obviously it does integrate well, it's basically pretty easy to use (if you can operate a regular fax machine, you can run eFax), and it's been around a while. But for the individual user or small companies, really, it's much too expensive, especially since there are so many other free or very cheap options out there. The "free trial" is a joke. Don't waste your time if you're going to sign up for it, just so you can send a quick fax, thinking you will cancel before the free trial ends. They're going to get money out of you one way or the other. Keep that number to your credit card's charge dispute line ready. If you only send the rare fax, bounce over to HelloFax instead and send it for free. Or set up the fax option in Microsoft and fax directly from your word processing software.
Cons
  • There are obscure file\page size limits on faxes sent through their API. They have a new version but it does not work with our software yet.
  • Expensive, shady "free trial" that bills you no matter what, doesn't offer anything in terms of increased efficiency or performance that I can't get from using a free or already installed on my machine service.
  • The performance for us is just very slow. I don't know if this is due to the encryption implementation or what, but the faxes are slow to load across different browsers and from different PCs. Not a deal killer, but annoying.
  • eFax at one point in time was a free service and now requires payment. eFax interfaces with a third party cloud storage. eFax collects cookies and session cookies ID per user and their computer. eFax company server stores personal information that may identify the user. eFax is required to maintain information per user for a limited time, within the terms of agreement of privacy, that time frame is unidentifiable.
73%
recommended this to a friend or a colleague

4 reviewers had the following to say about eFax Corporate's pricing:

Jon Amburn

Integrates well and is reliable

Used daily for 1-2 years
Reviewed 2018-04-17
Review Source: Capterra

I love how easy this is to use and the level of integration it has with our software. We send and receive faxes for it with very few problems. Their customer support team is out of this world. The longest I've waited for a reply was under an hour and that was because our direct rep was on a plane. We commonly have less than 5 minute response times. They give good price breaks on quantity.. we send and receive about 70,000 pages per month and get a great rate. Much more economical than maintaining standard machines.

Read the full review


eFax Corporate

Online faxing service

Anonymous

Reasonably priced, cloud based secure fax solution. Easy to adopt and fairly straight forward use.

Used weekly for 6-12 months
Reviewed 2018-04-04
Review Source: Capterra

Quick deployment of a cloud based, secure/encrypted eFax solution. Didn't break the budget.Reasonably priced way to adopt a secure, cloud based fax solution. Access inbound and outbound faxes from any device with a browser, securely. Automatic e-archive of fax communications.

Read the full review


eFax Corporate

Online faxing service

Beth Dash

Just no

Used other for 2+ years
Reviewed 2018-03-31
Review Source: GetApp

I suppose for big corporations (or law firms, where I once worked and eFax supplied everyone with their own fax line), this is a good product. However, even when I used it at the law firm, I did not always get notification as I should have, or as fast as I should have, of the receipt of a fax. Or confirmation of a fax. It's nice to have the history of the faxes you've received, so you can go back and get something if you need to. Obviously it does integrate well, it's basically pretty easy to use (if you can operate a regular fax machine, you can run eFax), and it's been around a while. But for the individual user or small companies, really, it's much too expensive, especially since there are so many other free or very cheap options out there. The "free trial" is a joke. Don't waste your time if you're going to sign up for it, just so you can send a quick fax, thinking you will cancel before the free trial ends. They're going to get money out of you one way or the other. Keep that number to your credit card's charge dispute line ready. If you only send the rare fax, bounce over to HelloFax instead and send it for free. Or set up the fax option in Microsoft and fax directly from your word processing software.

Read the full review


eFax Corporate

Online faxing service

Candace Eason

eFax securely sends your documents!

Used daily for 2+ years
Reviewed 2018-04-22
Review Source: Capterra

eFax by J2 offers end-users the ability to send secured faxes online. End-users can use eFax by J2 to send faxes via a computer desktop, laptop, or mobile device. The benefits of eFax is sending outgoing or receiving incoming faxes via a personally selected fax number. eFax allows users to manage account online. eFax is a great online faxing tool.eFax allows end-users to send documents online. eFax offers a free trial to send 150 pages per transfer. eFax allows end-users to send 150 incoming as well as outgoing faxes per the free trial. eFax does not require an initial activation fee. eFax allows end-users to select personal faxing number. eFax offers two types of subscriptions such as Plus and Pro with two different types of feature prices.

Read the full review


eFax Corporate

Online faxing service